Tag Archives: Native

History of Bees

Bee History

Bee & Milkweed vine smallWe are in the dog days of summer and many summer flowers are the stopping off place for many insects that also enjoy the summer flowers. Bees are looking for pollen and nectar that help maintain and build their hives over the winter. Honeybees are one of the first animals that were domesticated by man. Honey and bees wax have long been a sought after products by man. These little work horses are good at turning pollen and nectar into a food fit for Kings and the wax was used for many things. It does not go bad without refrigeration and stays good for some time.  It was also fermented to make mead a drink talked about in ancient times used by Vikings and Roman Gods.  The wax used as preservative and a source for light. Continue reading

Book Review “Brining Nature Home” by Douglas W. Tallamy

Brining Nature Home

…How Native Plants Sustain Wildlife in Our Gardens

By

Douglas W. Tallamy

 

Brining Nature Home …How Native Plants Sustain Wildlife in Our Gardens, Douglas W. Tallamy, Timber Press, Portland, Or;  Copyright 2077;  272 pages. Reviewed by Kenneth Wilson “The Gardening Whisperer”.

 

This review is prepared to be on www.Gadeneningwhisperer.com

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Bees and Pollinators

Peony And The BeeThere have been much emotional talks on the decline of bees in the past few years. The graphic representations show that bee hives have declined since the mid forties. Then when several massive bee kills in the past have happened fingers were pointed at insecticides. In order to get massive headlines they place blame at the newest insecticide, Neonics. GET RID OF ALL INSECTICIDES. Well that is a blown up headline grabbing statement and not a real solution to the problem.  Continue reading

Red Maple “The Native”

Red MapleThe native Red Maple is very diverse and has many cultivars because of this multiplicity in its gene which allows it to ranges from Canada through the southern states. From east and west it runs from the plans to the coast. The diversities of this plant can be seen as it grows from the low swamps to the rocky out crops of Missouri.
Because of the range of habitat of this tree it can grow in the moist area of the yard as well as dryer sites. While growing in dryer areas however the roots tend to come to the surface and can give rise to some problems as the tree matures. Continue reading

Bucks’ Unlimited Oak

ADDI1-129[1]In an age of small dominative plants that do not drop anything on to the manicured lawn of urban America it is refreshing to see a tree that produces large amounts of acorns being triumphed is astonishing. However this fast growing Swamp White Oak was selected not for the urban home owner but rather for the wild life and to be used in areas where the is deer and turkey populations abound. The attributes of this new and great tree are earlier flowering and fruiting large number of acorns thus giving the wild life, turkey and deer and waterfowl a good diet of natural food, making this an excellent tree to put into your food plot for the wildlife. Continue reading