Category Archives: Horticulture Tips

The dialogue will be about how to grow plants and make them healthier.

Book Review “The Allergy Fighting Garden” by Thomas Leo Ogren

The Allergy Fighting Garden Reviewed by Kenneth Wilson “The Gardening Whisperer”.

 

This review is prepared to be on www.Gadeneningwhisperer.com .   This book was written by Thomas Leo Ogren, 2015 and edited by Lisa Regul of Ten Speed Press.

ken cherrysThomas has a Masters Degree in Agricultural Science with an emphasis on plant flowering systems and their relationships to allergy. He is the creator of (OPALS) or Ogren Plant Allergy Scale.  He has been a teacher, business owner, landscaper, has been on TV. He has written many books and articles about plants and allergies. His whole career has been given to helping those with allergies. Continue reading

GROUND HOGS DAY

As told by Tree Frog:

It is only One (1) more days until Groundhogs Day, so what. Why silly people have been using a Ground Hog or whateverFrog small 2 they can find to predict the coming of spring and fresh flowers. Their guesswork is based on years of practice and refining. A tradition from the Pennsylvania German as it’s called Grundsaudaag or Murmeltiertag is celebrated on February 2.  If it is cloudy when a groundhog emerges from its burrow on this day, then spring will come early; if it is sunny, the groundhog will supposedly see its shadow and retreat back into its burrow, and the winter weather will persist for six more weeks. Continue reading

END OF 2015 START OF 2016

To my many friends Lilac winter small2;

This is an ending picture of the year; it is tribute of lilacs of past spring and the consideration of next spring’s blossoms to come. I hope youall (southern term) have had a grand 2015 and will have an enormous 2016.

I hope 2016 will bring me time and energy to write more and take more incredible photos so I can share with my friends.

Once again have Happy 2016.

GLADIOLAS

GLADIOLAS

Gladiolas Pink

Gladiolas Pink

Gladiolas or Glad’s as some people call them are a great summer bulb. Their attractiveness has diminished in the last decade or two. They were highly used as a cut flower in massive bouquets.  They are not winter hardy and have to be dug and stored over the winter and planted the following year. As it is not a native and the time involved to grow them many a Gardner has chosen not to grow them.

If you grew them this year it is the time to dig them and store in a 45. degree non lighted area.  Do not let them freeze.

However this all said they are a glorious addition to a garden and are a great cut flower. Look now for some great looking colors for next spring.

© www.gardeningwhisperer.com 2015

History of Bees

Bee History

Bee & Milkweed vine smallWe are in the dog days of summer and many summer flowers are the stopping off place for many insects that also enjoy the summer flowers. Bees are looking for pollen and nectar that help maintain and build their hives over the winter. Honeybees are one of the first animals that were domesticated by man. Honey and bees wax have long been a sought after products by man. These little work horses are good at turning pollen and nectar into a food fit for Kings and the wax was used for many things. It does not go bad without refrigeration and stays good for some time.  It was also fermented to make mead a drink talked about in ancient times used by Vikings and Roman Gods.  The wax used as preservative and a source for light. Continue reading

Two Full Moons in July

 

Full Moons of July

Or

Full Buck Moon and Blue Moon

 

We just finished the wettest month (June) ever in St. Louis. Going into the June we were behind the yearly average by 1.59 inches. June’s has an average rain fall of 3.83 inches; we received 10.51 inches thus we are a head of the year by 5.09 inches. The forecast for July is hot, hot, and hot so this may dry us out; I hope.  The normal rain fall for July is 3.9 inches and the total for year is 39.79 leaving us with only more 15 inches left for a normal year.

 

July has two full moons; One, July1 which is called the Full Buck Moon and the other on July 31 is called the Blue Moon.  Read why it called the dog days of summer and what is behind the names of the full moons on The Farmer’s Almanac; http://farmersalmanac.com/astronomy/2013/07/15/julys-full-buck-moon/

 

Other tidbits the Japanese Beetles are back and misquotes if they are not here they are Continue reading

DECORATION DAY

DECORATION DAY

This is my seventieth DECORATION DAY, (yes I know the name has changed) but it has always been a special day as it was the day my mother prepared flowers to decorate the graves of our ancestral history and the forgotten soldiers that had fought to make America free. From where we lived we had to trek in all four directions to visit the many cemeteries and graves this process took about a week to accomplish. I wish I could remember the stories mother told of each person that we stopped by and there location but time has eroded my mind. Continue reading

Bees and Pollinators

Peony And The BeeThere have been much emotional talks on the decline of bees in the past few years. The graphic representations show that bee hives have declined since the mid forties. Then when several massive bee kills in the past have happened fingers were pointed at insecticides. In order to get massive headlines they place blame at the newest insecticide, Neonics. GET RID OF ALL INSECTICIDES. Well that is a blown up headline grabbing statement and not a real solution to the problem.  Continue reading

Dormant Oil

DORMANT OIL AND SPRING SEASONAL PREPATION

On the eve of another snow storm all over North America it might be difficult to see the spring that is coming around the corner. Adding to the perception of we get this week we are still behind by two (2.5) inches, but we will catch up. Now is a great time to think about several ideas that will shorten your work time in your yard this summer. 

  • We watch the precipitation or moisture we receive: This will determine if irrigation is necesI 16 copysary all from germinating seed to new plants that we will plant in spring… Will find out how much we get and let you know…
  • Remember what insect problems that occurred last Year: Decide if you had insects, like aphids, scale, tent caterpillars or others, if so a dormant spray would give you a jump on the expanding numbers of these insects. If you do this in winter then you keep from burning leaves when they unfurl. There are several types of dormant oil, go to your garden centers and learn what your options are. Continue reading

Flowering Dogwoods

Preparing for Spring

  One can gain knowledge of what spring flowering dogwood trees will be like from looking at what is occurring in the fall. In the late summer tree Dogwoods or (Cornus florida) or (Cornus rubrum) types start their groundwork for a grand spring flower show. This requires both proper water and temperatures. Continue reading